November 2022 Newsletter

A Word from our President

Shawna

by – Shawna Cooley-Fenix Heating & Cooling

Hello,

Fall is finally here, and heating season has finally begun. With that in mind, I’d like to remind everyone that the board is always looking for Heat for the Holidays candidates.  If you know of anyone who is without heat, and who may be unable to afford repairs or replacement of their heating system, please let us know. We are here to help.

I would like to thank Tom Roberts for coming and discussing with us the upcoming changes in the HVAC industry for the  October general meeting.  Congrats to Kenneth for winning the $100.

Our November general meeting will be Thursday November 17th, for a 1 hour NON-code hour.  Daniel Fenn with Federated insurance will be there to speak about OSHA including updates to fines, the inspection process, top violations and proactive steps. Please make sure to RSVP if you will be there, thank you in advance.

Make sure to check out the flyer below for all the details about the KCCA Christmas party coming up in December and get your reservations in, It’s a FREE event.  Hope to see everyone there!

Don’t forget to bring your business cards for a chance to win $100!

Please feel free to email or call Shawna at (316) 945-4842 or shawnac@fenixheat.com with any concerns or questions.



Education

Be on the look out for upcoming information about classes starting February 2023.  These classes will be both in-sperson and online.


CONGRATULATIONS

KCCA board wants to congratulate 3 techs that put in for the tool scholarship. 

Zachary Drew with Reddi Industries

Abran Avelar with Becker Brothers

Stephen Mooney with Hanna


KCCA $500 TOOL SCHOLARSHIP
The board revised the Tool Scholarship a little. KCCA wants the employee to be working for the KCCA member for 3 months before they are eligible for the $500 tool Scholarship. So in short the employee or employer need to submit application and proof of graduation from one of our local trade school after the employee has worked for them for 3 months.


October’s General Meeting

KCCA would like to thank Tom Roberts for coming and speaking to the group about upcoming changes.  We had a GREAT turn out, lets keep it up!  Congratulations to Kenneth Baty with Reddi Industry for winning the $100!

Hope to see you @ future meetings!! All general meetings are held on the 3rd Thursday of every month except August & December.


2022-2023 Meetings

 
November 17th     Federated OSHA @ Scotch
December             NO MEETING (Christmas party 12/14/22)
January 19th         Stoney W/MABCD @ Scotch
February 16th        WTI @ WTI
March 16th            RGF @ Scotch
April 20th               Federated @ Scotch
May 18th                WSU Tech @ WSU Tech
June 16th

This list is subjust to change due to speakers not able to make the date we have selected for them.

2022-2023 Winter Weather Forecast

Weather in much of the U.S. this snowy season could go either way

By Hannah Belloli

SNOWY DAYS: Sarah Perreault, senior editor of The Old Farmer’s Almanac, predicted that most of the country is going to be colder than normal due to a neutral to weak El Niño. (Courtesy of Pixabay)

September 24, 2022

This year’s winter weather predictions vary from expert to expert and are subject to change as the season draws closer. But contractors can still prepare for whatever’s to come.

Paul Pastelok, senior meteorologist and lead U.S. long-range forecaster at AccuWeather, said that this year has been one of the most difficult forecasts he’s put together in years.

Peter Goble, climatologist and water availability specialist at Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University, interpreted the latest outlook from the National Weather Service (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center.

Pastelok and Goble both said that a third year of La Niña is likely, which usually means less cold early to mid-winter in the east. However, Sarah Perreault, senior editor of  The Old Farmer’s Almanac, said this winter it looks like a neutral to weak El Niño — which means most of the country is going to be colder than normal.

What does this mean for HVAC contractors? It could go either way.

“We kind of expect the worst of it to be in areas that are generally used to the cold and are prepared for it. That doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be ready for [abnormal weather] to hit,” Goble said.

Perreault said that the predicted El Niño informs HVAC contractors that people aren’t going to be needing their a/c; they’re going to be needing their heat.

Northeast

Sea surface temperatures over the Atlantic forecast a warmer winter, Goble said.

However, Perreault at  The Old Farmer’s Almanac said all of the Northeast region, besides the very tip of Maine, is forecasted to have below normal temperatures. The coldest periods will be in early and late January, and then again in February. The Northeast region can expect above average snowfall, with the most significant snow storms in early to mid-January.

Atlantic Corridor

Perreault predicts temperatures will be below normal, with above normal precipitation and snowfall. The coldest temperatures in this region will be in early and late January and most of February. The most significant snowstorm is expected at the end of January.

On the other hand, Goble said a warmer, milder start to winter is predicted. In November, there’s some “funky” stuff that could bring in some brief early cold snaps, he said, but the temperature should average above normal.

Appalachians

Temperatures are forecasted to be below normal, but snowfall will be above normal. Its coldest period will be in late January and mid to late February. A steady stream of snow showers is expected in early January and then again in late January, Perreault said.

Southeast

Both temperatures and precipitation are forecast to be below normal, Perreault said. Snowfall in this region will be above normal in the east and below normal in the west. The snowiest periods in this region will occur in early and late January and then again in mid-February.

Florida

Florida will experience a colder than normal winter with cold spells in early and late January, Perreault said, and then again in mid-February. February is forecast to be the rainiest month of the winter.

Lower Lakes

Temperatures are forecast to be below normal, with coldest periods in late January to mid-February. Both precipitation and snowfall will be above normal with periods of heavy snow in mid to late January, Perreault said.

Goble of Colorado Climate Center said that due to the forecasted La Niña winter, there will be a wet spot in this region.

Ohio Valley

Perreault predicts temperatures and precipitation to be below normal, and snowfall is forecast to be above normal. The coldest periods will be in early and late January and much of February. Snow periods will occur through January into late February and early March.

Goble said an increased chance of above normal precipitation is forecasted.

Deep South

Temperatures are forecast to be below normal, with below normal precipitation and above normal snowfall in the north, Perreault said. The likeliest chances for snow in the north will be in early to mid-January and then again in mid-February.

Upper Midwest

According to Perreault, temperatures are forecast to be below normal with its coldest periods scattered throughout January and then again in mid-February. Precipitation and snowfall will be below normal in the east and above normal in the western parts of the region. Heavy snowfalls begin as early as November and in early December.

Pastelok said things are a little fuzzy when looking at the Midwest in terms of temperature. AccuWeather can’t pin point confidently enough just yet if it’ll be a below normal winter, or back and forth enough between below and above where it averages out to being pretty normal.

Goble said an increased chance of above normal precipitation, and definitely snow. There’ll be some good winter storms here.

Heartland

Temperatures are forecast to be below normal, Perreault said, with the coldest periods in early to mid-January and mid to late February. Precipitation and snowfall will be above normal in the east and below normal in the west. Snowfall begins as early as November and snow weather is expected in early to mid-January and throughout February.

Goble said an increased chance of above normal precipitation, and an elevated probability to have milder than normal temperatures and below normal precipitation in Mississippi. 

Texas-Oklahoma

Goble said there’s an elevated probability of a somewhat mild winter. But, keeping in mind Texas’ winters the past few years, a cold outbreak shouldn’t be ruled out. There’s currently an elevated probability of below normal precipitation.

However, Perreault said temperatures are forecast to be below normal, with the coldest periods in early to mid-January and in early to mid-February. Precipitation will be below normal and in the northern part of the regions, snowfall is forecast to be above normal, with the snowiest chances in mid to late January and early February.

High Plains

Right now, climate models are showing more or less equal chances of above and below temperatures for this region, Goble said — but there will be big cold snaps either way.

Perreault said that temperature is forecast to be below normal, with the coldest periods beginning as early as November into early December, and in early and late January and February. Precipitation and snowfall will be above normal in the north and below normal in the south.

Pastelok of AccuWeather said the forecast is trending toward a mild winter in the first half of the winter, and a colder half in the second half of winter — resulting in a below-normal winter for the northern Rockies.

Intermountain

Temperatures will be above normal, Perreault said, though some cold spells are expected in mid-November and early February. Precipitation is forecast to be above normal with above normal snowfall in the far north and south, with snowiest periods in mid-to-late December and mid-January.

Desert Southwest

At this point, above normal temperature is predicted, said Pastelok. The region hasn’t yet recovered from last season’s abrupt end to snow and rain due to wildfire season, so above normal, dry temperatures are likely. North of Salt Lake City has a chance of snow.

Perreault agreed that temperatures will be above normal, adding that precipitation will be above normal as well. The coldest periods are in mid and late December and then again in mid-January. In the areas of that region that receive snow, the forecast is below normal amounts in early to mid-January and early February.

Pacific Northwest

Temperatures will be above normal with slightly below normal precipitation and snowfall, Perreault said. The cold arrives in November and in early and late December. Snow will arrive in November in the area that receives snow.

Goble said that in this region, there is an increased chance for below normal temperatures, and a slight tilt towards above normal precipitation.

Pacific Southwest

Another mild winter is expected this year, Goble said. There is an increased chance of above-normal temperatures for the winter season and an increased chance of below-normal precipitation.

Perreault said that temperature, mountain snow, and precipitation is forecast to be above normal. Cold temperatures will pop up in mid-November, mid-January, and early February.

TEMPERATURE: Winter weather temperature patterns expected to occur during this year’s predicted La Niña. (Courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).)
PRECIPITATION: Winter weather precipitation patterns expected to occur during this year’s predicted La Niña. (Courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). )
COLDER WEATHER: The Old Farmer’s Almanac weather map indicates huge differences in winter weather for both sides of the country. (Courtesy of the  Old Farmer’s Almanac)

Funny Photos


risk management corner

What Does a Million Dollar Electrical Cord Look Like?

The answer is: exactly like your electrical cords, except burnt. Everyday items and equipment at your business could cost you millions if they spark a fire due to improper use, lack of maintenance, or poor housekeeping practices. In the past several years, we’ve seen a sharp increase in the number of devastating fires among your industry peers. We don’t want you to experience the same fate. Fortunately, most fires can be prevented – but prevention starts with you. As a business owner, you are responsible for all aspects of your company’s safety. And, October is an excellent time to focus on fire hazards as National Fire Prevention Week falls October 9-15, 2022.

Take Action Now

 Walk through your business and note all the potential sources of fire. Federated clients can leverage a sample fire hazard checklist to help complete this task.

 Make sure the three elements that make up a fire — fuel, oxygen, heat — are kept separate at your facility.

 Complete scheduled maintenance on all equipment and machinery per manufacturer specifications.

 Make sure your facility has adequate electrical wiring and power. Never use electrical cords as a replacement for permanent wiring.

 Keep your facility clean – clean up any combustible trash, dust, or other materials from the premises every day.

 Conduct regular fire drills and communicate emergency procedures to employees.

 Train employees on the fire hazards at your business and encourage them to report any fire concerns. As they are working, employees are the ones best positioned to notice an overloaded extension cord or discarded oily rags. They need to know what to look for to help curb risks and prevent fire hazards from sparking.

Don’t become the owner of a million dollar electrical cord. You have the knowledge and responsibility to prevent fires at your business — and Federated is here to help. Federated Insurance® offers a variety of sample fire prevention plans, sample checklists, training resources, and more, which clients can access by logging in to mySHIELD®. Speak to your local Federated® Marketing Representative today to learn more.

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